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Crypto Influencer ‘Bitboy’ Files New Lawsuit, Aims to Reclaim “Stolen” Lamborghini

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Ben Armstrong. Source: a video screenshot, YouTube

Crypto YouTuber Ben Armstrong has filed another lawsuit against his ex-colleagues, over a Lamborghini and alleged racketeering.

Armstrong, formerly known as Bitboy, filed the lawsuit on November 1 in the Superior Court of Cobb County, Georgia, USA.

Six people related to Hit Network, the company that owned Armstrong’s channel, have been listed: CEO Timothy Shedd Jr., CFO Timothy Shedd Sr., head of content Nickolas Dimondi, contributor Allison Fiveash, associate Carlos Diaz, and Voomio CEO Justin Williams.

Armstrong claims that he was threatened into transferring the title of his 2018 Lamborghini Huracan Performante to Carlos Diaz.

“Defendant Diaz warned Armstrong that he had killed people before, and implied that the same fate could befall Armstrong,” per the suit.

Diaz never returned the car, the suit says, adding: “Armstrong is not aware of the Lamborghini’s current location or ownership status.”

Furthermore, the lawsuit alleges that the six people violated the Georgia Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act. The defendants have “engaged in a pattern of racketeering by engaging in a series of acts, schemes, and transactions that were all committed with the intent to extort the Lamborghini and money from Armstrong.”

The YouTuber claimed that Diaz contacted Armstrong’s wife and threatened his life unless he paid $3.2 million and issued a public apology.

The defendants also took Armstrong’s Twitter account in order to harass, embarrass, and intimidate him publicly, he said.

At Least Half a Dozen Lawsuits


Armstrong is not the only one filing lawsuits.

Per one of several filings in the same court, the Shedds and Williams sued Armstrong in September for – among other things – libel and slander.

“This type of bullying is what we have come to expect from Ben Armstrong,” Dimondi told Decrypt. “The entire complaint is laughable on its face and has no merit in court.”

A county clerk also confirmed to Decrypt that several cases against Armstrong are still pending.

In September, Armstrong confronted Diaz, saying that he wanted to get his car and ‘expose’ Diaz and other defendants. He was arrested and detained for “loitering/prowling” and “simple assault by placing another in fear,” with a bond amount of $2,600.

After his release, he made light of the situation.

Ousted


In late August, Armstrong announced his departure, stating that “TJ Shedd & Justin Williams have attempted a coup at my company.”

Meanwhile, CEO Shedd claimed that there had been “emotional, physical and financial damage” caused by Armstrong to Hit and the community.

Armstrong filed a lawsuit in September against the father-son Shedd duo for ousting him from the company he had founded. The suit was initially filed on August 30, retracted, and refiled on September 12.

Armstrong and BJ Investment Holdings (BJIH) were named as plaintiffs.  BJIH is the parent company of Hit Network and the YouTube channel formerly called Bitboy Crypto, now Discover Crypto.

In late September, the crypto influencer claimed that HitNetwork took all of his money so he couldn’t fight back. He asked his followers to donate to his legal fund to bring BitBoy Crypto back.

While the supporters donated thousands of dollars, others criticized Armstrong for asking for money from his followers.