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Fate of Sam Bankman-Fried’s Co-Defendants Uncertain: Prison Sentences Loom?

Ruholamin Haqshanas
Last updated: | 2 min read
Source: Adobe / Александр Поташев

With Sam Bankman-Fried, the convicted founder of FTX, facing the prospect of spending decades in a federal prison, some are wondering what lies ahead for his former colleagues and co-defendants.

Nishad Singh, FTX’s director of engineering, Gary Wang, the exchange’s chief technical officer, and Caroline Ellison, former CEO of FTX sister trading firm Alameda Research, had previously pleaded guilty to fraud and conspiracy charges in December.

Their cooperation and testimony played a pivotal role in securing Bankman-Fried’s conviction.

However, this doesn’t guarantee that the former crypto executives are in the clear.

Ellison, Singh, and Wang still face the possibility of maximum prison sentences of 110, 75, and 50 years, respectively.

As part of their agreement with prosecutors, they will receive 5K motions—letters that describe their criminal conduct and the extent of their assistance to the prosecution.

While these letters won’t recommend specific sentence lengths, U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan, who will also determine Bankman-Fried’s sentence, will consider them during the sentencing hearing scheduled for March 28, 2024.

Ellison, Singh, and Wang Still Face Prison


Although Ellison, Singh, and Wang may hope that their cooperation will spare them from prison time, the trio still face possible prison time.

In federal financial fraud cases, the amount of money involved often influences the severity of the sentence.

The FTX and Alameda scheme was estimated as a $10 billion fraud, making it a significant factor in determining the potential sentence.

Christopher Zoukis, a legal consultant experienced in federal prison matters, claimed that without any departures or mitigating factors, the defendants could be looking at prison terms ranging from 17.5 to 21.8 years.

Given the high public interest in the trial, Kaplan may choose to make an example of Ellison, Singh, and Wang.

On the other hand, he may also recognize their assistance in bringing down Bankman-Fried, whom prosecutors described as one of the most significant financial fraudsters in American history.

Zoukis believes that this case’s unique circumstances and media exposure may lead to an unconventional sentencing approach, possibly resembling that of cartel cases.

If Ellison, Singh, or Wang were to receive prison sentences, but for less than 12.5 years, they would likely be placed in minimum-security federal prisons.

These facilities, characterized by dorm-style living arrangements, are generally considered non-violent and represent the best options within the federal prison system.

In the event that the former crypto executives avoid detention, they may still be required to return stolen funds and potentially pay restitution to victims.

As reported, Bankman-Fried is potentially facing decades in prison when sentenced in March.

However, the trio are likely to receive little to no prison time for their cooperation, according to legal experts.

All three admitted to participating in fraudulent activities under Bankman-Fried’s direction, involving the transfer of billions of dollars in FTX customer funds to Alameda, a hedge fund mostly owned by Bankman-Fried.